What you Need to Know About: Agent’s Visual Inspection Disclosure (AVID)

As one of my favorite brokers once joked, an agent visual inspection disclosure (AVID) is a visual inspection that an agent can do in heels. The point being that both individual sales agents in a transaction (the listing agent represent the seller and the selling agent representing the buyer. If it is dual agency, both individuals must still produce their own visual inspection disclosures, if one individual is representing both parties, you would only expect to see one AVID form) are required to perform a visual inspection of the property, but neither is expected to show up in overalls, ready to crawl through crawlspaces or stick their head in attics or in downspouts.

// This post is a part of our series: Your Guide to a San Francisco Disclosure Package. //

The Agent Visual Inspection Disclosure (AVID) is a *property specific* disclosure. Read it as soon as it is available.

AVID - Agent Visual Inspection Disclosure Form
AVID – Agent Visual Inspection Disclosure Form

Here’s the thing to remember about an agent’s visual inspection: We aren’t licensed contractors, which means we aren’t qualified to diagnose what we see. Our job is to note what we see at the property that is unusual or stands out to us – the idea being that since we see lots of homes as part of our job, the things that stand out might be important things for the buyer or seller to be aware of.

That said, at every risk management seminar I’ve ever been to I’ve pretty much heard the same instructions/advice from a variety of real estate attorneys: describe, don’t diagnose. Which means a good AVID will state things like “cracks visible along wall” instead of something like “hairline cracks caused by settling visible along wall.” An agent isn’t typically qualified to diagnose the underlying cause of a visible issue.

It is also important to remember that an agent doesn’t move furniture, look underneath things, move piles of stuff or otherwise try and take apart the home.

An agent’s visual inspection is not a substitute for an inspection by a contractor or other licensed home professional – it is simply a “once-over” list of things that were readily apparent to the agents involved in a residential real estate transaction. It is also important to remember that if you are purchasing/selling a condo home, the AVID does not include any of the common areas – it covers the condo home itself, not the common areas that accompany ownership of the condo.

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