New Zephyr Listing at 3858 Market St, San Francisco, CA 94131 for $1,299,000

3858 Market St, San Francisco, CA 94131

Rarely available, PANORAMIC view residence on an extra-large lot! Located off of Market St on the Argent turnaround, and perched high on the hill, this classic home combines the charming elegance of the Edwardian period with all the modern amenities of today. A gracious entry to the main living level provides high ceilings, pristine wood floors, fireplace and expansive views. Double doors from the dining room open to the walk-out deck. Stairs up lead to the three bedrooms and an exquisite bath. The lower level, also with tall ceilings, offers a separate entrance for easy conversion into private guest quarters or rental income. This home has all the benefits of an urban location, yet provides the space and feeling of a tranquil oasis

View Listing

New Zephyr Listing at 212 Beverly St, San Francisco, CA 94123 for $789,000

212 Beverly St, San Francisco, CA 94123

Meticulously maintained 3 bedroom, 2 bath 1930’s home on a nice block. 1484 square feet. Main level has living room with fireplace, formal dining room, remodeled eat-in kitchen, bathroom and two generous bedrooms. Downstairs huge master suite with lux bath and a sitting area. Beautiful hardwood throughout, crown moldings, lovely 30’s detail. Very stylish and thoughtful remodel. 2 car garage, garden. Close to Stonestown, Trader Joes, Ocean Avenue Whole Foods, ez access to 280 and MUNI. Great value for a great home!

View Listing

New Zephyr Listing at 433 Buena Vista Ave Unit A, San Francisco, CA 94117 for $595,000

433 Buena Vista Ave Unit A, San Francisco, CA 94117

Enchantingly beautiful and bright 1 bed, 1 bath TIC where Buena Vista meets Tales of the City. Step inside this delightful compound with incredible views of the city and Red Rock. This truly charming space boasts recent upgrades including a remodeled kitchen, bamboo floors, carpet, in-unit laundry, hot water heater and copper piping work. Sip your favorite beverage while enjoying the city views from your front porch. For an especially intimate setting, venture out onto your own exclusive-use outdoor deck off the living room. Bright & simply amazing, this home also comes with a bonus room underneath measuring approximately 9′ x 10′. A gem of an opportunity in a stunningly beautiful neighborhood-right across the street from Buena Vista Park.

View Listing

San Francisco Leads the Region as Top City for Rental Real Estate Investment

It is undeniable that San Francisco is a great place to live. Vibrant neighborhoods, an exceptional art and cultural scene, fantastic restaurants, world-class shopping and a stunning natural landscape have all helped San Francisco secure a place among the top cities in the country. With the release of the All Property Management Q2 2014 Rental Ranking Report, the City by the Bay can also add being the No. 1 city in the region – and No. 3 in the country – for rental real estate investment to its list of accolades.

Saving money

The Q2 2014 Rental Ranking Report looks at metrics including vacancy rates, capitalization rates, home value appreciation, annual job growth, rental rate variance, and average days a property sits on market for 75 Metropolitan Statistical Areas to determine the top U.S. cities that are poised to give investors the highest return on their rental real estate investment. San Francisco took the top spot regionally, beating out cities such as San Jose, Seattle, Denver, and Los Angeles, while coming in 3rd only to Grand Rapids, MI (No. 1) and Poughkeepsie, NY (No. 2) in the country.

San Francisco Boasts High Rental Rate Variance to Secure Top Ranking 

With rising San Francisco rental rates a main topic of conversation in the community, it will come as no surprise to locals that the city does quite well in the rental variance metric. In fact, with an 8.44 percent increase in year-over-year rental rates, San Francisco takes the No. 1 spot for rental variance among the 75 cities studied, according to the report. While performing generally well in most categories, this rental rate variance certainly helped San Francisco clinch the top regional spot.

San Francisco also boasts one of the lowest vacancy rates in the report at 4.9 percent (giving it a 10th place ranking in the country) and a good home value appreciation rate of 4.95 percent year-over-year. What might surprise you, however, is the city’s relatively low capitalization rate. The “cap rate,” which compares average property value to average rental rates to determine how profitable a rental may be, is 4.07 percent in San Francisco. This is the second-smallest cap rate in the report. By comparison, Grand Rapids, the No. 1 ranked city in the U.S., offers a cap rate of 9.64 percent. The low cap rate is partially fueled by San Francisco’s high property values.

If you’ve been sitting on the fence toying with the idea of buying San Francisco rental real estate, the All Property Management Q2 2014 Rental Ranking Report suggests you should make a move. Opportunity is waiting – will you take advantage?

This is a guest post from All Property Management.

Founded in 2004, All Property Management helps property owners maximize their rental income potential by connecting them with the largest network of property management services on the Internet. As part of that work we track a number of different metrics, from rental vacancy rates and home values to regional job growth, for 75 different metro areas in 5 regions of the country. We use that data, along with input from our nationwide network of over 5,000 property managers, to produce our quarterly Rental Ranking report, which measures a city’s attractiveness for real estate investment.

New Zephyr Listing at 171 Great Circle Dr, Mill Valley, CA 94941 for $3,300,000

171 Great Circle Dr, Mill Valley, CA 94941

Mill Valley Contemporary Custom designed by Dan & Hal Weiss in 1999, this 6BD/5BA Mill Valley estate embodies the very best of Marin living. An expansive level yard, lush gardens, fruit and palm trees, this incomparable estate property offers the kind of indoor-outdoor living unique to Marin County. Views of Sausalito Harbor and Mt. Tam are amazing! Large level yard with spacious patio areas for indoor-outdoor entertaining and an expansive open floor plan combine for traditional living with 6 bedrooms on the second floor and large home office/guest suite off the main entry. Exhibiting meticulous attention to every detail, the home features energy efficient solar panels, Heavenly Turf lawns and heated floors in the kitchen.

View Listing

Dog restrictions in HOAs: yes or no?

Full disclosure: I love dogs. I’m the crazy dog lady who posts ridiculous numbers of photos of my puppy on Facebook. (She’s ridiculously cute, so I can’t help it.) So it’s no surprise that I find the dog restrictions in many HOAs to be, well, ridiculous. Many prohibit dogs who weigh over 35 pounds. The lowest I’ve seen is 20 pounds. The highest I’ve seen is 70 pounds, but that one was an outlier.

photo
The JacksonFuller team mascots — Bonnie (Matt’s dog) and Maddie (Britton’s dog).

My guess is that an HOA will decide to cap the weight of any resident dogs to try to maintain peace and quiet in the building. I decided to look up which dog breeds bark the most, and according to the ILoveDogs website, here’s the list:

  1. Beagle
  2. Basset hound
  3. Jack Russell terrier
  4. Keeshond
  5. Maltese
  6. Lhasa Apso
  7. Boston Terrier
  8. Miniature Pinscher
  9. Samoyed
  10. West Highland White Terrier

See any kind of trend on that list? Seven of these ten are small dogs that would be welcome in an HOA — and be more likely to bark than their larger doggie brethren. So there goes that justification for a weight restriction.

Perhaps the HOA believes that bigger dogs need more exercise and will make more noise just by moving around the condo. According to Pet Plan, the laziest dogs are:

  1. Basset Hound
  2. Bernese Mountain Dog
  3. Bichon Frise
  4. Brussels Griffon
  5. Bullmastiff
  6. Chihuahua (WHAT?)
  7. Chow Chow
  8. Clumber Spaniel
  9. Cocker Spaniel
  10. Dachshund
  11. English Bulldog
  12. English Mastiff
  13. French Bulldog
  14. Greyhound
  15. Havanese
  16. Leonberger
  17. Newfoundland
  18. Saint Bernard
  19. Tibetan Terrier

Fourteen of these 19 couch potato dogs are medium or large. So it’s difficult to justify the blanket belief that bigger = louder.

What about the possibility that a bigger dog will make a bigger mess in the common areas, say, if a wet dog walks in from the rain with muddy paws? I say that one goes back to the owner — no matter how big or small the dog, the owner needs to dry off Fluffy or Fido before walking through the lobby or into the elevator. Common courtesy is common courtesy, regardless of the size of the pooch at the end of the leash.

The last one I’ll mention is breed restrictions — probably one of the foremost political hot buttons of the dog world today. Many HOAs prohibit breeds such as pit bulls, mastiffs, Rottweilers or Dobermans. This one is more difficult because in some cases it’s out of the HOA’s control — the HOA’s insurance policy may prohibit these dogs or others considered to be “fighting breeds.” (And while it’s not the case in San Francisco, some cities have enacted breed-specific bans on certain dogs. Not surprisingly, the ASPCA is against these laws, and there are many passionate arguments on both sides.)

HOAs are trying to reduce liability and financial exposure by limiting breeds that are perceived to be dangerous. What do you think? Should HOAs prohibit dogs of certain breeds or over a certain weight?