55 Page St Unit 427, San Francisco, CA 94102 for $336,575, SFAR MLS ID {listing_id} – New Zephyr Listing

2 BR Below Market Rate unit. Must be 1st-time homebuyer & income eligible. Maximum income for 2 people = $81,500; 3 = $91,700; 4 = $101,900, etc. Application, loan pre-approval, homebuyer education certificate and SF Purchase Contract due on 07/07/15 @ Realtor’s office. Application at www.sfmohcd.org. Pls contact Realtor for more info. Unit available thru the Mayor’s Office of Housing and Community Development & subject to resale controls, monitoring & other restrictions. See sf-moh.org for program info. Buyer responsible for Transfer Tax and all Escrow and Title Fee’s. Fair Housing Opportunity.

Learn More about 2 BR Below Market Rate unit. Must be 1st-time homebuyer & income eligible. Maximum income for 2 people = $81,500; 3 = $91,700; 4 = $101,900, etc. Application, loan pre-approval, homebuyer education certificate and SF Purchase Contract due on 07/07/15 @ Realtor’s office. Application at www.sfmohcd.org. Pls contact Realtor for more info. Unit available thru the Mayor’s Office of Housing and Community Development & subject to resale controls, monitoring & other restrictions. See sf-moh.org for program info. Buyer responsible for Transfer Tax and all Escrow and Title Fee’s. Fair Housing Opportunity.

55 Page St Unit 427, San Francisco, CA 94102 for $336,575, SFAR MLS ID {listing_id} – New Zephyr Listing

2 BR Below Market Rate unit. Must be 1st-time homebuyer & income eligible. Maximum income for 2 people = $81,500; 3 = $91,700; 4 = $101,900, etc. Application, loan pre-approval, homebuyer education certificate and SF Purchase Contract due on 07/07/15 @ Realtor’s office. Application at www.sfmohcd.org. Pls contact Realtor for more info. Unit available thru the Mayor’s Office of Housing and Community Development & subject to resale controls, monitoring & other restrictions. See sf-moh.org for program info. Buyer responsible for Transfer Tax and all Escrow and Title Fee’s. Fair Housing Opportunity.

Learn More about 2 BR Below Market Rate unit. Must be 1st-time homebuyer & income eligible. Maximum income for 2 people = $81,500; 3 = $91,700; 4 = $101,900, etc. Application, loan pre-approval, homebuyer education certificate and SF Purchase Contract due on 07/07/15 @ Realtor’s office. Application at www.sfmohcd.org. Pls contact Realtor for more info. Unit available thru the Mayor’s Office of Housing and Community Development & subject to resale controls, monitoring & other restrictions. See sf-moh.org for program info. Buyer responsible for Transfer Tax and all Escrow and Title Fee’s. Fair Housing Opportunity.

2014 Median Single Family Sales Price by Neighborhood

We recently released our 2014 SF Real Estate Report, which tracks five key statistics for SF home prices in every SF neighborhood, for both single family homes and condos. We follow the SF condo market in depth at sfmoderncondos.com, and the information for single family homes is here on jacksonfuller.com:

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Of the roughly 80 neighborhoods tracked by the SFAR MLS, only 19 of them have a median sales price of under $1,000,000.  The least expensive neighborhood for a single family home in 2014 was The Bayview, with a median sales price of $600,000. The most expensive neighborhood for a single family home in 2014 was Presidio Heights, with a median sales price of $5,950,000. Here’s the entire breakdown:

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SF Home Prices: Median Sales Price of greater than $3,000,000 in 2014

 

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SF Home Prices: Single Family Home median sales price from 2.5 mil to 3.0 mil in 2014

 

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SF Home Prices: Single Family Home median sales price from 2. mil to 2.5 mil in 2014

 

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SF Home Prices: Single Family Home median sales price from 1.5 mil to 2.0 mil in 2014

 

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SF Home Prices: Single Family Home median sales price from 1.25 mil to 1.50 mil in 2014

 

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SF Home Prices: Single Family Home median sales price from 1.0 mil to 1.25 mil in 2014

 

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SF Home Prices: Single Family Home median sales price from $750,000 to 1.0 mil in 2014

 

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SF Home Prices: Single Family Home median sales price of $750,000 or less

 

As we all know, single family homes in San Francisco are expensive and only getting more so. 2014 was a year where numerous neighborhoods set records. Almost all new construction in SF is for condo homes, there is one current project – Summit 800 – that is selling single family homes in the city.

We’d love to hear your thoughts about SF home prices in the comments below, on our facebook or linked in page, and you can also find us on twitter and instagram.

Watch our Buyer Get Keys to her family’s new home

Our client, Ceci, opens the door to her family’s new home for the first time in this video. Watch our client a home buyer get keys:

Thank you to Ceci for documenting and sharing your family’s journey with us. I feel privileged to have you as a client but also as a dear friend. Oh, the memories…!

I can’t wait to be a part of a few beautiful-moments-yet-to-arrive at your family’s awesome new home.

With deep affection,

Matt

PS – This really was an incredible team effort. Thanks to the phenomenal SF mortgage broker team at Opes led by Tracy Andreini and also to a consummate listing agent, Alan Khoo with the JODI Group.

Rainpocalypse 2014

Yesterday was the first day since I’ve had a school aged child that school has been cancelled. I’m fairly certain that if it wasn’t for three years of horrific drought, the hype surrounding our current storm would be a lot, lot less. But hey, we need rain and we finally got some! Below is a little footage (taken mostly out at Ocean Beach) showing our weather on Thursday, December 11 – the day that will go down in infamy as #rainpocalypse.

What you should know about the Buyer Inspection Election (BIE)

The Buyer Inspection Election is used in conjunction with all of the many other inspection disclosures for a buyer to make a record of which inspections they’ve chosen to perform on the property they are purchasing.

// This post is a part of our series: Your Guide to a San Francisco Disclosure Package. //

The Buyer Inspection Election (BIE) is a *general property* disclosure. It contains language that does not vary from transaction to transaction and is not property specific.

Pictured below is the Buyer Inspection Election (BIE). The beginning of the document recounts advice and information that is mirrored in numerous other documents that talk about inspections. The long and short of it is that when making a major investment, doing due diligence is incredibly important, and here are some possible inspections you could have…

Buyer Inspection Election form in California.
Buyer Inspection Election form in California.

If you’ve been keeping track, you’ll note that there are *a lot* of disclosures and disclosure documents that relate to property inspections. For those of you who are familiar with my theory about the origin of disclosure documents, you can quickly surmise what the real estate lawsuits are about.

While the form language suggests that a buyer complete it at the beginning of their inspection period, I’ve never seen it used that way. Why? Because most buyers are smart buyers and want to maximize their knowledge of the property with the minimum expenditure of money. So, most buyers (in SF, at least) start with a general contractor’s inspection. If a general contractor/general home inspection turns up further items for investigation – then buyers generally decide if they want to continue investing in inspections or if they just want to cancel the purchase contract.

The Buyer Inspection Election is a great document for a buyer to confirm the inspections they’ve chosen to have for the property they are buying. In my experience, I’ve only seen this form filled out if the deal is going to close, because if a deal falls apart during inspections there’s really no need to document which inspection contained information that wasn’t acceptable to the buyer.

And while I admire the thinking behind the form, the actual execution of that idea could use some improvement, IMHO.

For example, the form lists square footage, lot size, boundaries, and survey as four different inspections. The general purpose of a survey is to determine lot size and boundaries – so which boxes do you check?

What about an inspection for an issue related to a foundation that involves information about soil stability? Do we check for a soils inspection, or a foundation inspection, or both?

 

What are the differences between a plumbing inspection and a “water systems and components” inspection?

Given that the purpose of this document is to bring clarity to inspection choices, I think it has a lot of room for improvement.