What you need to know about District 5 Single Family Home Sales in 2012

The parade of 2012 real estate market statistics continues. Last week we started off with an overview of the 2012 San Francisco market, and last week we looked at home sales in northwest San Francisco, and Zephyr 2012 market share. Today I’m going to skip ahead a few neighborhoods from District 1 to District 5, which is the central part of San Francisco and includes the following neighborhoods/mls-subdistricts:

  • Glen Park
  • Haight Ashbury
  • Noe Valley
  • Twin Peaks
  • Cole Valley/Parnassus Heights
  • Buena Vista/Ashbury Heights
  • Corona Heights
  • Clarendon Heights
  • Duboce Triangle
  • Eureka Valley/Dolores Heights (aka Liberty Hill)
  • Mission Dolores

chart_5 (7)
The chart above shows the median days on market for single family homes in District 5, broken out by neighborhood. As you can see, median days on market was down, sometimes substantially so… with Mission Dolores, Clarendon Heights, and Eureka Valley (Castro) being exceptional examples of how competitive 2012 was if you were a buyer.chart_4 (3)
The chart above looks at the number of single family homes sold by neighborhood in 2012. It is interesting for a couple reasons – it does a pretty good job of showing what neighborhoods in district 5 have single family homes (when we compare this with condos in the coming days it will give you a good idea of the types of housing that predominate any given neighborhood). Even though the number of sales was either up or slightly down year over year, we still saw a decrease in days on market, which is exactly what we would expect when demand exceeds supply.
chart_5 (6)

Finally, the chart above shows the median sales price of a single family home in each of the district 5 neighborhoods. It’s no surprise that Clarendon Heights led the way with the most expensive median sales price, with the 2012 price being up both year over year and compared to 2009. Another thing to note is that some neighborhoods (like Twin Peaks) have very few single family homes, so small sample sets can lead to some erroneous conclusions… for example, that Twin Peaks prices are plummeting. I may try and get a post in this week that compares 2011 and 2012 single family home sales in Twin Peaks, to give you an idea of how small data sets lead to graphs like the above.

Happy Tuesday, I’m out the door for broker’s tour. I hope you have a great day!