Whole Foods on Market Street opening November 6

This morning, like the grocery geeks we are, Matt and I took a tour of San Francisco’s newest Whole Foods, opening next Wednesday, November 6. It’s located at 2001 Market Street @ Dolores, the site of the former S&C Ford dealership.

Photo tour (click on any image for a larger version/slideshow):

A few nuts & bolts first…

Number of Whole Foods Markets in San Francisco: 7

Approximate square footage of new store: 27,000

Number of parking spaces for the store: 63

Number of those that are for electric cars: 2

Hours of operation: 8:00 am – 10:00 pm every day

Official opening day/bread-breaking: November 6, 9:45 am (They don’t cut ribbons, they break bread. Cool, huh?)

While the Safeway across the street continues quaking in its staid corporate boots, I’ll describe some of the unique features of the new Whole Foods.

Just to the left of the main entrance is a two-seat shoeshine stand, operated by a local vendor called A Shine & Co., adjacent to a wall of what our tour guide called “man products.” By which she meant “men’s grooming stuff,” like shaving gear and skin care. The shoe shine stand will be open daily until about 6:00 pm.

Now for some unique-to-this-store food items. Oh, Whole Foods, you had me at sausage on a stick, made in house and available in the grab-and-go section. There will also be locally made gelato with flavors like Blue Bottle Coffee (Ok, you had me at sausage on a stick AND Blue Bottle Coffee gelato). The bakery will put out mini foccacia in a variety of flavors daily.

Every Whole Foods has a hot bar, but this one amps it up with an entire section of the hot bar with all Paleo foods. If you’re throwing a cheese tasting party and you need 250 kinds of cheese from around the world, they’ve got you covered. They’ll also sell honeycomb from Steve’s Bees in Orinda and tell those of us who are unfamiliar with honeycomb how to pair it with cheese. Who knew?

Now I’ve got to bust on Whole Foods a little bit for a cake with a big ol’ carbon footprint. They’re selling cakes called Baum cakes and they’re flying them in from Denver. DENVER. That’s far away from San Francisco, even though a layer cake cooked in a rotisserie sounds really damn cool.

What you need to know about District 5 Single Family Home Sales in 2012

The parade of 2012 real estate market statistics continues. Last week we started off with an overview of the 2012 San Francisco market, and last week we looked at home sales in northwest San Francisco, and Zephyr 2012 market share. Today I’m going to skip ahead a few neighborhoods from District 1 to District 5, which is the central part of San Francisco and includes the following neighborhoods/mls-subdistricts:

  • Glen Park
  • Haight Ashbury
  • Noe Valley
  • Twin Peaks
  • Cole Valley/Parnassus Heights
  • Buena Vista/Ashbury Heights
  • Corona Heights
  • Clarendon Heights
  • Duboce Triangle
  • Eureka Valley/Dolores Heights (aka Liberty Hill)
  • Mission Dolores

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The chart above shows the median days on market for single family homes in District 5, broken out by neighborhood. As you can see, median days on market was down, sometimes substantially so… with Mission Dolores, Clarendon Heights, and Eureka Valley (Castro) being exceptional examples of how competitive 2012 was if you were a buyer.chart_4 (3)
The chart above looks at the number of single family homes sold by neighborhood in 2012. It is interesting for a couple reasons – it does a pretty good job of showing what neighborhoods in district 5 have single family homes (when we compare this with condos in the coming days it will give you a good idea of the types of housing that predominate any given neighborhood). Even though the number of sales was either up or slightly down year over year, we still saw a decrease in days on market, which is exactly what we would expect when demand exceeds supply.
chart_5 (6)

Finally, the chart above shows the median sales price of a single family home in each of the district 5 neighborhoods. It’s no surprise that Clarendon Heights led the way with the most expensive median sales price, with the 2012 price being up both year over year and compared to 2009. Another thing to note is that some neighborhoods (like Twin Peaks) have very few single family homes, so small sample sets can lead to some erroneous conclusions… for example, that Twin Peaks prices are plummeting. I may try and get a post in this week that compares 2011 and 2012 single family home sales in Twin Peaks, to give you an idea of how small data sets lead to graphs like the above.

Happy Tuesday, I’m out the door for broker’s tour. I hope you have a great day!

Duboce Park Mini-Makeover

From the fine folks at Friends of Duboce Park comes a reminder about an upcoming community meeting that will provide an overview of changes proposed to the park’s entrance at the corner of Steiner and Duboce. As you can see from the rendering below, the changes will “bump-in” to the corner of the park, providing seating and community/neighborhood information. The meeting is scheduled for this Wednesday, November 28 from  7–8 pm in the Harvey Milk Photo Center Exhibition Room.

Proposed corner of Duboce Park. Image source: Friends of Duboce Park

From an email sent out by the group:

Friends of Duboce Park (FDP) is holding the second of three community meetings tomorrow night to present and get feedback on the design for improvements to the Steiner Street and Duboce Avenue corner of Duboce Park to make it a more welcoming and attractive gateway to the park. The corner is currently a dark, damp, and uninviting spot. We want your feedback. The community meeting tomorrow will be at the Harvey Milk Photo Center Exhibition Room from 7-8 p.m.

Working with a group of local landscape architects, FDP has come up with a plan to create a more inviting gateway into Duboce Park. As the picture above shows, a low, semi-circular wall creates more seating, a common request from park users. The design of the low seating wall echoes the wall around the Scott Street Labyrinth, with angled cutouts on top of the wall to deter skateboarding. Low shrubs and plants behind the wall keep the direct line of sight into the park and deter people from hopping over the seating wall to enter the park.

Additional lighting to match existing park lighting fixtures will improve safety at the corner. The addition of the way finder signs will point to and offer distances to nearby key facilities and neighborhoods, for example, Harvey Milk Center for the Arts, Harvey Milk Photography Center, the Lower Haight and Castro neighborhoods, CPMC, Buena Vista Park, Dolores Park, etc. The way finder signs also coordinate in style with existing park fixtures…