Amazing 1960s Condominium Remodel

An architect from MacCracken Architects sent me an email showcasing a beautiful job they did renovating a 1960′s era condo in San Francisco on Russian Hill. Some real estate shoppers have the ability to envision what a space can become, but most people don’t have that gift. Which is why staging your home helps buyers understand how to use the space. I didn’t represent the buyers of this condo, so I don’t know if they have the rare gift of seeing what can be, or if they had help from professionals while searching. Regardless, I wanted to showcase this beautiful ‘before and after’ condo remodel.

While I could blather for paragraphs about what a beautiful job they did transforming some very ‘meh’ space into something amazing, I think the pictures speak for themselves. Click on any image below to view a larger version and start the slideshow.

From the project team at MacCracken:

This 1,000 square foot 1960s condominium on Russian Hill was a challenge to make efficient use of a small living area and illustrates how well thought out design can transform very limited space. Existing rooms were rearranged and previously partitioned areas were opened to take advantage of the stunning San Francisco Bay views and light. Mahogany corridor cabinet walls define the central circulation and provide storage and shelving for artifacts and art. The monolithic wood corridor walls convey a warm contrast to the white perimeter of the rest of the volume while primary natural light from the view side of the apartment is transferred through vertical translucent glass openings to provide a relative balance of light to spaces with limited natural light.

DESIGN TEAM: Stephen MacCracken (Principal), Daniel Robinson (Principal), Hutch Mouradian (Project Architect)

CONTRACTOR: Derry Casey Construction

FURNITURE: By owner

PHOTOGRAPHY: Rien Van Rijthoven

Thanks to the folks at MacCracken for providing the before and after images, and allowing me to blog about their phenomenal remodel!

2011 Most Expensive homes in SF

What were the most expensive homes sold in San Francisco during the 2011 calendar year? I always have to wait for the tax records to catch up with December recordings, but now that they have, the results are in. It was a blockbuster year for luxury real estate in 2011!

To refresh your memory, here is our 2010 list of the most expensive homes in San Francisco. As you can see from the list below, Pacific Heights dominated the top 10 sales list, with 6 out of the most expensive homes sold in 2011 located in that neighborhood. Presidio Heights comes in second place with two sales, and Yerba Buena and Russian Hill each have one sale.

Rank       Address                         Sales Price              Source
1 2840 Broadway $ 33,000,000 Tax
2 2950 Broadway $ 29,500,00 Tax/MLS
3 188 Minna St. – PHA $ 28,000,000 Tax
4 2920 Broadway $ 23,473,000 Tax
5 3070 Pacific Ave. $ 20,000,000 Tax
6 3701 Washington $ 12,100,000 Tax/MLS
7 2550 Green St. $ 9,500,000 Tax/MLS
8 3362 Jackson $ 9,250,000 Tax
9 2323 Hyde St. $ 9,000,000 MLS
10 60 Normandie Ter. $ 8,800,000 Tax/MLS

 

2840 Broadway was an off-market deal, while 188 Minna St. (the only condo to make the list this year, with all of the other sales being single family homes) was the foreclosure sale at The St. Regis that received plenty of press during the year.

It was clearly a good year to be among the 1%, with the 2011 most expensive sale coming in more than twice as high as the top 2010 sale (2600 Pacific Ave). Five of this year’s most expensive real estate deals were valued at $ 20,000,000 or more, while not one of the 2010 sales broke the twenty million dollar mark. Broadway Avenue kept it’s ranking as the most expensive street to live on, with three of this year’s sales located in the Pacific Heights stretch of Broadway, which was the same as last year.

So there you have it – the top 10 most expensive San Francisco home sales in 2011. Talk amongst yourselves about these homes and their respective sales prices. Good investment for the years to come, or outrageous and unjustifiable at any price? Keep your comments friendly but interesting :-)